Arts & Culture News

Arlington's 3-Day Music Festival Ramblin' Roads Includes a Sunday Gospel

Here's what the new Globe Life Field could look like when the city of Arlington is finished expanding its entertainment district. The city is getting started with a 3-day festival.
Here's what the new Globe Life Field could look like when the city of Arlington is finished expanding its entertainment district. The city is getting started with a 3-day festival. Artist's rendering from City of Arlington
Road tripping music lovers may want to head to Arlington this fall and ramble around some of the city’s music venues. That’s because Ramblin’ Roads, a three-day music festival, is set to take place there the first three days of October.

The inaugural event features more than 50 bands and multiple genres across 18 venues as well as special events including a youth voice competition, an artisan market, a classic car show and a Sunday gospel brunch.

Arlington is known as a sports destination but is trying hard to become a major entertainment hub. In December 2019, council members approved an $810 million expansion to the city's entertainment district. Through the upcoming festival, the city will morph, temporarily at least, into a music mecca as sounds of country, blues, Latin, pop, rock, bluegrass, jazz and more fill the air.

Listed among the country/Americana genre is September Moon, who’ll take the stage starting at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 at J. Gilligan’s Bar & Grill.


“Our hometown is in Arlington, so we’re very excited to be a part of our hometown’s first-year festival,” says bandmember Daniel Brown, who describes the festival as “unique,” having been made possible “in large part” by the Texas Music Office and its recent designation of the City of Arlington as a music-friendly community.

“[September Moon] prides itself in delivering very high-energy shows and impressing audiences with their tight three-part harmonies, alternating lead vocals, and catchy melodies,” says a press release that further describes the band as a “lively, vocal harmony-centered band that creatively blends country, folk, rock, Red Dirt, and Americana into one unique sound.”

"The music fest is a team effort by the downtown Arlington area venues,” Brown says.

The event was spearheaded by local marketing guru Garret Martin and Downtown Arlington president and CEO Maggie Campbell.


Along with the bands, pass holders can watch an American Graffiti screening starting at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 at Arlington Music Hall.

"The music fest is a team effort by the downtown Arlington area venues.” –September Moon's Daniel Brown

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The classic car show is open to the public from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 at Vandergriff Town Center as well as the Youth Voice Competition from 1-3:30 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 3 at Arlington Music Hall and the Urban Artisan Marketplace that’ll happen 4-8 p.m. Oct. 3 at Legal Draft Beer Co.

Dallas’ Big Ass Brass Band is listed among the festival’s headliners. They’ll take the stage at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 3 at Levitt Pavilion during Jazz in the Park, which runs from 5-9:30 p.m. on Sunday at the pavilion.

“Powerhouse and innovative, the Big Ass Brass Band makes audiences want to shake their hips and move their feet,” says the release. “With an original blend of second-line, funk, hip-hop and jazz, the Big Ass Brass Band delivers music full blast.”

Concert tickets cost $45 for a one-day pass, $100 for all three days and VIP passes cost $250. Children 6 years old and under get free admission and children ages 7 through 12 can get in for half price.

Grammy award-winning artist Myron Butler will perform during the gospel brunch at Sanford House Inn and Spa from 12:30- 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 3. That event, hosted by Franklin Imagine Group, features Restaurant506 cuisine and requires an additional ticket.
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