Locations in Dallas

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  • Blue Mesa Grill

    7700 W. Northwest Highway Park Cities

    214-378-8686

    The meal to have at this area favorite is the Mexican breakfast buffet. Families in their post-church Sunday best line up for the omelet bar, and Tex-Mex offerings such as the chicken and mushroom enchiladas with chipotle cream sauce and waffles. The rest of the menu, with as many ingredients locally sourced as possible, is marked by higher-end Mexican and Tex-Mex specialties such as slow-roasted natural chicken with caramelized honey-ancho glaze and the blue-corn-crusted mahi mahi with roasted poblano aioli. Of course, tacos make an appearance, but we're talking beef tenderloin tacos here. The décor follows suit with clean and colorful appointments. Reservations are most definitely recommended.
    3 articles
  • The Dream Cafe

    5100 Beltline Rd. North Dallas

    972-503-7326

    Eats from across the globe converge at this anything-but-greasy-spoon diner that has served customers for more than 17 years. Great place for a weekday breakfast or a weekend brunch, with their Cloud Cakes and whole wheat pancakes or a variety of Tex Mex-style egg dishes such as migas and Austin tacos. Enjoy a mocha latte while taking advantage of free Wi-Fi in a purple booth. If you're still there for lunch, order the shrimp tacos or pasta pignoli with Dallas mozzarella or the Santa Fe salad with grilled chicken, avocados, cherry tomatoes and goat cheese. For the peace-love-and-brown-rice set there's organic black beans and brown rice, the main part of the Global Dinner. For those with tots, there is an outdoor jungle gym and a lovely patio, though a condo development has seriously cut into what was once an outdoor playground for kids and adults alike.
    4 articles
  • Picasso's

    18160 Dallas Parkway Carrollton/Farmers Branch

    972-248-0011

  • Razzoo's Cajun Cafe

    3270 S. Central Expressway, Mc Kinney Allen/McKinney

    469-547-6130

    We look at it as the poor man's Pappadeaux, with humbler aspirations and much humbler prices. Funny thing is, the more we go there, the more we like it; it's gotten to the point where we'd rather sit at a tin-topped table at Razzoo's than wait in line at Pappadeaux. The blackened tilapia fillet, for example, rings in at barely over $10, and it was moist, tasty, and fresh in a meuniere sauce, accompanied by dirty rice and broccoli. Other stuff by this locally based chain is even cheaper. We ordered the spicy chicken tenders for the small child but ended up eating most of them ourselves; we also enjoyed an excellent side order of rich red beans and rice. For dessert, don't miss the exceptional bread pudding.
    1 article
  • Razzoo's Cajun Cafe (Uptown Village at Cedar Hill)

    305 W. Farm to Market Road 1382 Cedar Hill

    972-291-0606

    We look at it as the poor man's Pappadeaux, with humbler aspirations and much humbler prices. Funny thing is, the more we go there, the more we like it; it's gotten to the point where we'd rather sit at a tin-topped table at Razzoo's than wait in line at Pappadeaux. The blackened tilapia fillet, for example, rings in at barely over $10, and it was moist, tasty, and fresh in a meuniere sauce, accompanied by dirty rice and broccoli. Other stuff by this locally based chain is even cheaper. We ordered the spicy chicken tenders for the small child but ended up eating most of them ourselves; we also enjoyed an excellent side order of rich red beans and rice. For dessert, don't miss the exceptional bread pudding.
    1 article
  • Razzoo's Cajun Cafe (Firewheel Town Center)

    310 Coneflower Dr. Garland & Vicinity

    214-427-8215

    We look at it as the poor man's Pappadeaux, with humbler aspirations and much humbler prices. Funny thing is, the more we go there, the more we like it; it's gotten to the point where we'd rather sit at a tin-topped table at Razzoo's than wait in line at Pappadeaux. The blackened tilapia fillet, for example, rings in at barely over $10, and it was moist, tasty, and fresh in a meuniere sauce, accompanied by dirty rice and broccoli. Other stuff by this locally based chain is even cheaper. We ordered the spicy chicken tenders for the small child but ended up eating most of them ourselves; we also enjoyed an excellent side order of rich red beans and rice. For dessert, don't miss the exceptional bread pudding.
    1 article
  • Razzoo's Cajun Cafe

    1990 S. Stemmons Freeway Lewisville

    972-316-0326

    We look at it as the poor man's Pappadeaux, with humbler aspirations and much humbler prices. Funny thing is, the more we go there, the more we like it; it's gotten to the point where we'd rather sit at a tin-topped table at Razzoo's than wait in line at Pappadeaux. The blackened tilapia fillet, for example, rings in at barely over $10, and it was moist, tasty, and fresh in a meuniere sauce, accompanied by dirty rice and broccoli. Other stuff by this locally based chain is even cheaper. We ordered the spicy chicken tenders for the small child but ended up eating most of them ourselves; we also enjoyed an excellent side order of rich red beans and rice. For dessert, don't miss the exceptional bread pudding.
    1 article
  • Steve Fields Steak and Lobster Lounge

    5013 W. Park Blvd. Plano

    972-596-7100

    1 article
  • 18th & Vine

    4100 Maple Ave. Uptown/Oak Lawn

    214-443-8335

    18th & Vine’s name comes from the neighborhood that put Kansas City jazz on the map, and the main dining room's cream-colored walls pay homage to those roots with photos of KC greats like Charlie Parker and Count Basie. The decor is classic and upscale eclectic, with none of the kitschy country touches that seem to define other barbecue joints. Tall windows brighten the interior, and the natural light will make Instagram photos of food look incredible. In fact, 18th & Vine is more than a “joint” — it’s an honest to goodness restaurant, with elevated menu choices to match. Come dinner hour, a sandwich-intensive lunch menu is replaced with chef Scott Gottlich’s eclectic entrées. The bone-in pork chop and pork belly come with a perfectly cooked chop served on a bed of mashed sweet potatoes, adorned with small spheres of granny smith apples and a savory glaze. The pork belly is equally amazing; bites started with rich smoke and ended with a sweet caramel finish, as if the pork turned into dessert in your mouth. For those who don't eat meat, the cauliflower steak is grilled and served with a cauliflower puree. A small selection of sweets includes a divine fried apple pie.
    14 articles
  • Abacus

    4511 McKinney Ave. Park Cities

    214-559-3111

    Since 1999, Abacus has represented the quintessence of creative dining injected with a good dose of common sense. Today, its neutral-beige interior feels like a time capsule from 1999; its menu, an abrupt collision between Texas steakhouse and Japanese sushi bar, is similarly dated. The good news is that the food can still be good, and occasionally great. Even better, the happy hour is one of the best deals in Dallas. Half of the menu is elegant renditions of Southwestern grilling classics — venison steaks, rib-eyes, quail, mac and cheese — and the other half is sushi. The Texas game side of the menu is the more successful. Best of all is an exceptionally well-cooked venison tenderloin, a bold red medium rare and the tender, simply grilled stuff of meat-fueled dreams. Two lamb chops are similarly divine and crusted in pecans.
    38 articles
  • Abuelo's

    1041 W. Interstate 20 Arlington

    817-468-2622

    Since 1989, Abuelo's Mexican Food Embassy has been shuttling back and forth with Mexican and Tex-Mex diplomacy. Both cuisines are available on the menu -- and in generous portions. However, it's the Mexican food that is favored by the kitchen. The house specialties include Stuffed Chicken Medallions (fried chicken breast stuffed with chorizo, Poblano chilies and cheese) and Pescado Guerrero (wood-grilled, mahi-mahi with shrimp, scallops, mushrooms, spinach, roasted peppers and sliced avocado in a white-wine sauce). The combo platters, named after cities like Nogales and Laredo, are where the Tex-Mex shines with all its border-crossing festiveness. The Juarez comes with a crispy beef taco, a tamale, sour cream chicken enchilada and a cheese enchilada. Enjoy any of the aforementioned dishes with a signature drink, like the sangria-margarita hybrid.
  • Addison Café

    5290 Belt Line Rd., Suite 108 North Dallas

    972-991-8824

    Quiet, white tablecloth French restaurant has been open since the mid-1980s. The service and some of the cooking seems a lot older-and that's a good thing if you're a fan of traditional dishes such as duck l'orange or steak au poivre.
    1 article
  • Adelmo's

    5450 W. Lovers Ln., #225 Park Cities

    214-559-0325

    This two-story bistro blends cuisines from around the Mediterranean: Italian, French and Middle Eastern. The casual air and wide-ranging menu make it a popular spot, especially for slurping up some wonderful osso bucco, the exceedingly tender, long-stewed veal shanks that are a house specialty. Quaint and very romantic setting.
  • Afrah Mediterranean Grill & Buffet

    318 E. Main St. Richardson & Vicinity

    972-234-9898

    Afrah offers authentic Lebanese fare influenced by a variety of Mediterranean flavors. The food is a feast for the senses, famous for Shawarma Pita sandwiches, fresh bread, pies and our homemade gelato and baklava. Afrah started as a pastry shop in February of 2002. The Mediterranean sweets became so popular that they decided to sell more of the family’s traditional Southern Lebanese recipes, evolving into a full service restaurant.. The dishes evolved from the family's recipes, prepared in house with Halal meats and the freshest ingredients.
    3 articles
  • Akbar Indian Restaurant

    301 W. Parker Rd., Ste. 115 Plano

    972-422-4398

    No-fuss Indian food seems to do the trick when it comes to pleasing the masses, but Akbar does much more with its Mughal (North Indian) cuisine. Specialty dishes include Barra Akbari (skewered lamb marinated with yogurt and spices and grilled over charcoal fire). And don't fret about the apparent absence of curry on the menu at first glance -- a closer look reveals the Murg Curry Shahajani, a chicken dish from the time of the Shah Jahan, the emperor who built the Taj Mahal, or perhaps the Murg Goblwala with cauliflower. Samosas also make an appearance, as does the omnipresent lunch buffet. Thankfully, the Mughal food (otherwise know as royal cuisine) doesn't come with a hefty price tag. Plus, the BYOB policy doesn't hurt.
  • Al Biernat's

    4217 Oak Lawn Ave. Uptown/Oak Lawn

    214-219-2201

    Al Biernat is the czar of the front door, the dining room sheik, and that's all you need to know. Bred at The Palm where he held court as frontman for some 22 years, Al Biernat knows that great steaks and fine seafood vibrate beyond their requisite flavor profiles when jolted with charm. Al Biernat's is riddled with all of the staples: the jumbo shrimp cocktails and the jumbo lump crab cakes; the fried calamari crusted in potato; the iceberg wedge with the blue cheese gravel, the creamed spinach and creamed corn, and potatoes in six guises. Surprises bud from the uniformity. Al features elegant caviar service, blackened sea scallops with Polynesian rice, and Colorado elk to pair with his thick roster of prime Allen Brothers steaks (one of them, a Kobe-Black Angus hybrid filet). Plus, Biernat's diverse but tightly constructed wine list means that every bite will finish in vintaged savor. It's the epitome of meats and greets.
    36 articles
  • Al-Amir Restaurant

    3885 Belt line Rd. Addison

    972-488-2647

    3 articles
  • Alamo Drafthouse

    100 S. Central Expressway Richardson & Vicinity

    972-534-2120

    This Austin-based chain is known for simultaneously serving up booze, food and great movies. Alamo Drafthouse resides in an old Pep Boys in the Richardson Heights Shopping Center, and has 740 seats backed up with a full kitchen and 40 beers on tap.
    60 articles
  • Amici Signature Italian

    1022 S. Broadway St. Carrollton/Farmers Branch

    972-245-3191

    Amici has a lot to boast about – great food, an intimate atmosphere and a pretty endearing location, considering it's way out in Carrollton. But the best thing about the cozy Italian restaurant is the chef's pants. When we visited, they appeared to be patterned with various types of peppers in a plethora of colors. We know this because Chef Bartolino is not only talented but friendly, frequently venturing out into the 48-seat restaurant to greet his guests. It's a nice touch since a full meal at Amici is just on the other side of expensive, but it's the ideal spot for any special-occasion dinners you may be inclined to host in the northern suburbs. Seafood lovers will rave about the shrimp dishes, and the tiramisu is fluffy and picturesque, with just the right amount of coffee liqueur. Make reservations early in the day; you'll have a guaranteed table and something to look forward to when your afternoon at work stretches on forever.
    3 articles
  • Angelo's Bar-B-Que

    2533 White Settlement Rd. Fort Worth

    817-332-0357

    The brisket is melt-in-your mouth tender, its flavor rich and smoky, and all you need to say as you approach the counter is "sliced" or "chopped". The lightning-fire hands behind the counter will take care of the rest. The beer is cold and the mugs are huge. Who could ask for more?
    1 article
  • Angelo's Spaghetti House

    6341 La Vista Dr. East Dallas & Lakewood

    214-823-5566

    The giant, complimentary garlic rolls are reason enough to visit this Lakewood bistro. But the culinary fare that comes along with it is just as good. The sampler plates are particularly tasty. Choose from choices such as the chicken parmesan, cheese ravioli with marinara sauce and fettuccine alfredo plate and the seafood manicotti, shrimp pomodora and shrimp diavolo plate. For workweek lunches, try the all-you-can-eat buffet.
    1 article
  • Antonio's Ristorante

    4985 Addison Circle, Addison North Dallas

    972-458-1010

    Luciano Cola's Italian restaurant combines rustic and elegant elements to create a casual atmosphere where friends and family can commiserate, businessmen can close deals and couples can cavort over a plate of antipasto misto della casa. Sure, there are plates of spaghetti drowned in red sauce. There is also lasagna Ripiena alla Romana (lasagna stuffed with meatballs, sausage and three cheeses), homemade gnocchi (Antonio's is a family outfit) and paglia e fieno (straw and hay). The latter is green and white fettuccine with ham, mushrooms, cream and Parmesan. The Cioppino Antonio, the house version of fisherman's stew, is huge in portion and popularity. Also popular are the pizzas, like the traditional and complex capricciosa. Ask about the daily risotto special.
    1 article
  • Arcodoro & Pomodoro

    100 Crescent Court, Ste. 140 Uptown/Oak Lawn

    214-871-1924

    Arcodoro & Pomodoro is no longer the casual, family-friendly Italian joint it was when the restaurant was in residence on Routh Street, and that's a boon for serious devotees of Sardinian cooking. Now in nearby Crescent Court, the restaurant excels at hard-to-find dishes such as suckling pig, panadeddas and delicate "music bread." While the pastel décor is underwhelming, diners are advised to keep their eyes on their plates-especially when enjoying the irresistible grilled sea bass, plunked between crispy crab cakes and served over scallop spinach pasta.
    14 articles
  • Avanti Ristorante

    2720 McKinney Ave. Uptown/Oak Lawn

    214-871-4955

    Owner Jack Ekhtiar's small restaurant is a place where hip meets classic. Dark wood frames live jazz. Rustic Mediterranean fare, predominately Northern and Southern Italian, is presented elegantly. Among the examples are farfalle carbonara, a 6-ounce Brazilian lobster tail over spinach linguini alfredo and shrimp as well as carpaccio Avanti with white truffle oil. On weekends, revelers can enjoy the Moonlight Breakfast from midnight-3 am. During that seating, guests can request the signature Avanti Omelet (Italian sausage, mushrooms, green peppers and feta cheese) alongside escargot Chablisien, which is sautéed in garlic, vine-ripened tomatoes and mushrooms, then tossed with angel hair pasta, for the fancy-pants partier.
    7 articles
  • Babe's Chicken Dinner House

    230 N. Center St. Arlington

    817-801-0300

    The small menu here reflects the predominantly fried All-Stars of Texan and Southern cuisine. There's fried chicken and chicken-fried steak, natch. There's fried catfish and pot roast. There's fried chicken tenders and smoked chicken. That's the entire selection of main dishes at Babe's Chicken Dinner House. No joke. And that's a relief to see in a market chock-full of Southern/soul food shops slinging what seems like infinite permutations on the fried. The selection of side dishes (gravy, mashed potatoes, sweet corn, green beans, green salad and biscuits) and desserts (pineapple upside-down cake, chocolate meringue pie, coconut meringue pie, lemon meringue pie and banana pudding) is similarly tiny. But what's not tiny? The portions. They're served in true down-home style, with helpings as large as the elastic-waistband pants needed to eat at Paul Vinyard's 11,000 square-foot homage to poultry.
    4 articles
  • Babe's Chicken Dinner House

    1006 W. Main St. Carrollton/Farmers Branch

    972-245-7773

    The small menu here reflects the predominantly fried All-Stars of Texan and Southern cuisine. There's fried chicken and chicken-fried steak, natch. There's fried catfish and pot roast. There's fried chicken tenders and smoked chicken. That's the entire selection of main dishes at Babe's Chicken Dinner House. No joke. And that's a relief to see in a market chock-full of Southern/soul food shops slinging what seems like infinite permutations on the fried. The selection of side dishes (gravy, mashed potatoes, sweet corn, green beans, green salad and biscuits) and desserts (pineapple upside-down cake, chocolate meringue pie, coconut meringue pie, lemon meringue pie and banana pudding) is similarly tiny. But what's not tiny? The portions. They're served in true down-home style, with helpings as large as the elastic-waistband pants needed to eat at Paul Vinyard's 11,000 square-foot homage to poultry.
    8 articles
  • Babe's Chicken Dinner House

    104 N. Oak St., Roanoke Fort Worth

    817-491-2900

    The small menu here reflects the predominantly fried All-Stars of Texan and Southern cuisine. There's fried chicken and chicken-fried steak. That's the entire selection of main dishes at Babe's Chicken Dinner House. No joke. And that's a relief to see in a market chock-full of Southern/soul food shops slinging what seems like infinite permutations on the fried. The selection of side dishes (gravy, mashed potatoes, sweet corn, green salad and biscuits) is similarly tiny. But what's not tiny? The portions. They're served in true down-home style, with helpings as large as the elastic-waistband pants needed to eat at Paul Vinyard's original Babe's location.
    10 articles
  • Babe's Chicken Dinner House

    1456 Belt Line Rd., #171 Garland & Vicinity

    972-496-1041

    We figure there's something wrong with people who can't enjoy an occasional fried chicken dinner. Nonetheless, we feared we'd be wandering onto the documentary set piece for America: The Obese at Babe's, a venerable family dining establishment in a Garland strip mall, a place where you'd expect to find an all you can eat fried chicken restaurant. We were wrong, sort of. Not everyone looked like they'd been feeding on fried chicken skin their entire lives, but all-you-can-eat places do tend to serve as magnets for the gluttonous. If we're going to overdo it, it might as well be with fried chicken and side dishes as tasty as these. Babe's serves up family-style dinners which include piles of super-crispy, thick-breaded monster chicken pieces, an iceberg lettuce salad (very fresh, with a sweet vinaigrette), tasty green beans, creamed corn (for those who can stand the sight of it), biscuits and excellent mashed potatoes. Everything, it seems, is doused in butter. Babe's has a few other things on the menu as well, including hickory-smoked chicken, pot roast, chicken-fried steak and fried catfish. Eat till you explode.
    15 articles
  • Baboush

    3636 McKinney Ave. East Dallas & Lakewood

    214-599-0707

    Persistent chatter and clanking silverware signals that you've found one of Uptown’s more promising dining spots in Baboush. Hummus and babaganoush are safe plays, served with plenty of warm pita for dipping, but the entire menu warrants attention. Shrimp and chicken kebabs and other street plates deliver bites that push conventional Moroccan cooking while staying true to tradition. No matter what you order, make use of whatever condiment is served at its side. Baboush has a condiment king working in the kitchen, and his hard work makes every plate sing.
    5 articles
  • Bailey's Prime Plus Steakhouse

    8160 Park Lane Northeast Dallas

    214-750-8100

    Beef's the star at this upscale eatery, but the kitchen staff thankfully strays into the dairy section of the food pyramid to do miraculous things with liberal doses of cheese. The manly menu includes a terrific appetizer of Romano-encrusted crisp-tender asparagus; bacon-wrapped shrimp crammed with cheddar; "that salad," featuring brandied cherries and crumbled Oregon blue; filthy rich scalloped potatoes and an unforgettable four-cheese lobster mac that pairs beautifully with a rib-eye or filet. Still, the restaurant's true to steakhouse traditions, treating its guests with kid-gloves care: Leftovers-if there are any-are sent home in black boxes closed with gold monogram seals.
    6 articles
  • Baker's Ribs

    6516 E. Northwest Highway East Dallas & Lakewood

    214-373-0082

    The pink pig signage lures barbecue devotees to this palace of smoked pork. The rustic interior accentuated with red-and-white checker oilcloth tables gives the restaurant a 'cue shack feel. Stepping into Baker's Ribs is like stepping into a roadside barbecue joint. The signature St. Louis-style ribs are tender. However, the brisket is almost as much a customer favorite. With a thick, dark crust and smoky flavor, it's no wonder. The expected combo options, like the "two-meater," are available and can be greedily consumed with sweet tea and other classic barbecue accompaniments like cole slaw and corn bread. But at owners Joe and Suzanne Duncan's barbecue joints, it's all about the pork, even offering their own version of a spicy pork taco for less than a two-spot.
    2 articles
  • Banana Leaf Thai

    17370 Preston Rd. Richardson & Vicinity

    972-735-8778

    This far North Dallas spot is probably more neighborhood than destination, but tasty dishes and charming decor keep it in the game. Fried rice dishes come out quickly, which might raise an eyebrow, but fluffy rice with tasty chunks of pineapple and chicken was a surprise and relief. The grilled chicken smothered in peanut sauce looks bland but recovers with appropriate sweetness amidst jasmine rice and colorful steamed vegetables. Service was fairly attentive with nary a half-empty drink or an open sugar packet on the table, but when the initial order was mistaken, enough time passed for others to be half finished with their plates.
    2 articles
  • Bangkok City

    4301 Bryan St. East Dallas & Lakewood

    214-824-6200

    With a no-frills menu of basic Thai options, Bangkok City is one of the most consistent stops for Thai food in the metroplex. It boasts a healthy number of vegetarian options, as well as a hearty variety of chicken and beef dinners. Especially potent are its Imperial Rolls – tofu and shrimp with vegetables wrapped in rice paper – and cold Thai salads. But the crispy duck is the star of the show. A roasted half bird, fried until crisp and served with chili peppers onions and crunchy fried basil leaves, will come as spicy as you like. If four-star “native Thai” isn't hot enough, ignore the menu and order as many stars as you like. One guy ordered 17 stars. He was never heard from again.
    8 articles