Locations in Dallas

523 results

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  • The Dream Cafe

    5100 Beltline Rd. North Dallas

    972-503-7326

    Eats from across the globe converge at this anything-but-greasy-spoon diner that has served customers for more than 17 years. Great place for a weekday breakfast or a weekend brunch, with their Cloud Cakes and whole wheat pancakes or a variety of Tex Mex-style egg dishes such as migas and Austin tacos. Enjoy a mocha latte while taking advantage of free Wi-Fi in a purple booth. If you're still there for lunch, order the shrimp tacos or pasta pignoli with Dallas mozzarella or the Santa Fe salad with grilled chicken, avocados, cherry tomatoes and goat cheese. For the peace-love-and-brown-rice set there's organic black beans and brown rice, the main part of the Global Dinner. For those with tots, there is an outdoor jungle gym and a lovely patio, though a condo development has seriously cut into what was once an outdoor playground for kids and adults alike.
    4 articles
  • Razzoo's Cajun Cafe

    3270 S. Central Expressway, Mc Kinney Allen/McKinney

    469-547-6130

    We look at it as the poor man's Pappadeaux, with humbler aspirations and much humbler prices. Funny thing is, the more we go there, the more we like it; it's gotten to the point where we'd rather sit at a tin-topped table at Razzoo's than wait in line at Pappadeaux. The blackened tilapia fillet, for example, rings in at barely over $10, and it was moist, tasty, and fresh in a meuniere sauce, accompanied by dirty rice and broccoli. Other stuff by this locally based chain is even cheaper. We ordered the spicy chicken tenders for the small child but ended up eating most of them ourselves; we also enjoyed an excellent side order of rich red beans and rice. For dessert, don't miss the exceptional bread pudding.
    1 article
  • Razzoo's Cajun Cafe (Uptown Village at Cedar Hill)

    305 W. Farm to Market Road 1382 Cedar Hill

    972-291-0606

    We look at it as the poor man's Pappadeaux, with humbler aspirations and much humbler prices. Funny thing is, the more we go there, the more we like it; it's gotten to the point where we'd rather sit at a tin-topped table at Razzoo's than wait in line at Pappadeaux. The blackened tilapia fillet, for example, rings in at barely over $10, and it was moist, tasty, and fresh in a meuniere sauce, accompanied by dirty rice and broccoli. Other stuff by this locally based chain is even cheaper. We ordered the spicy chicken tenders for the small child but ended up eating most of them ourselves; we also enjoyed an excellent side order of rich red beans and rice. For dessert, don't miss the exceptional bread pudding.
    1 article
  • Razzoo's Cajun Cafe (Firewheel Town Center)

    310 Coneflower Dr. Garland & Vicinity

    214-427-8215

    We look at it as the poor man's Pappadeaux, with humbler aspirations and much humbler prices. Funny thing is, the more we go there, the more we like it; it's gotten to the point where we'd rather sit at a tin-topped table at Razzoo's than wait in line at Pappadeaux. The blackened tilapia fillet, for example, rings in at barely over $10, and it was moist, tasty, and fresh in a meuniere sauce, accompanied by dirty rice and broccoli. Other stuff by this locally based chain is even cheaper. We ordered the spicy chicken tenders for the small child but ended up eating most of them ourselves; we also enjoyed an excellent side order of rich red beans and rice. For dessert, don't miss the exceptional bread pudding.
    1 article
  • Razzoo's Cajun Cafe

    1990 S. Stemmons Freeway Lewisville

    972-316-0326

    We look at it as the poor man's Pappadeaux, with humbler aspirations and much humbler prices. Funny thing is, the more we go there, the more we like it; it's gotten to the point where we'd rather sit at a tin-topped table at Razzoo's than wait in line at Pappadeaux. The blackened tilapia fillet, for example, rings in at barely over $10, and it was moist, tasty, and fresh in a meuniere sauce, accompanied by dirty rice and broccoli. Other stuff by this locally based chain is even cheaper. We ordered the spicy chicken tenders for the small child but ended up eating most of them ourselves; we also enjoyed an excellent side order of rich red beans and rice. For dessert, don't miss the exceptional bread pudding.
    1 article
  • Steve Fields Steak and Lobster Lounge

    5013 W. Park Blvd. Plano

    972-596-7100

    1 article
  • Abacus

    4511 McKinney Ave. Park Cities

    214-559-3111

    Since 1999, Abacus has represented the quintessence of creative dining injected with a good dose of common sense. Today, its neutral-beige interior feels like a time capsule from 1999; its menu, an abrupt collision between Texas steakhouse and Japanese sushi bar, is similarly dated. The good news is that the food can still be good, and occasionally great. Even better, the happy hour is one of the best deals in Dallas. Half of the menu is elegant renditions of Southwestern grilling classics — venison steaks, rib-eyes, quail, mac and cheese — and the other half is sushi. The Texas game side of the menu is the more successful. Best of all is an exceptionally well-cooked venison tenderloin, a bold red medium rare and the tender, simply grilled stuff of meat-fueled dreams. Two lamb chops are similarly divine and crusted in pecans.
    38 articles
  • Abuelo's

    1041 W. Interstate 20 Arlington

    817-468-2622

    Since 1989, Abuelo's Mexican Food Embassy has been shuttling back and forth with Mexican and Tex-Mex diplomacy. Both cuisines are available on the menu -- and in generous portions. However, it's the Mexican food that is favored by the kitchen. The house specialties include Stuffed Chicken Medallions (fried chicken breast stuffed with chorizo, Poblano chilies and cheese) and Pescado Guerrero (wood-grilled, mahi-mahi with shrimp, scallops, mushrooms, spinach, roasted peppers and sliced avocado in a white-wine sauce). The combo platters, named after cities like Nogales and Laredo, are where the Tex-Mex shines with all its border-crossing festiveness. The Juarez comes with a crispy beef taco, a tamale, sour cream chicken enchilada and a cheese enchilada. Enjoy any of the aforementioned dishes with a signature drink, like the sangria-margarita hybrid.
  • Adair's Saloon

    2624 Commerce St. Downtown/Deep Ellum

    214-939-9900

    Adair’s Saloon is Deep Ellum’s outpost for what truly makes country music country. With frequent guest musicians representing the best of outlaw country from North Texas and around the nation, Adair’s boasts a honky tonk vibe in a dive bar atmosphere. The kitchen is open until 1:30 a.m. nightly offering some of the best bar burgers, sandwiches and wings for a surprisingly reasonable price. Be sure to grab a pen and leave your mark on the wall. Some may call it graffiti, but the good folks at Adair’s call it art.
    23 articles
  • Addison Café

    5290 Belt Line Rd., Suite 108 North Dallas

    972-991-8824

    Quiet, white tablecloth French restaurant has been open since the mid-1980s. The service and some of the cooking seems a lot older-and that's a good thing if you're a fan of traditional dishes such as duck l'orange or steak au poivre.
    1 article
  • Al Biernat's

    4217 Oak Lawn Ave. Uptown/Oak Lawn

    214-219-2201

    Al Biernat is the czar of the front door, the dining room sheik, and that's all you need to know. Bred at The Palm where he held court as frontman for some 22 years, Al Biernat knows that great steaks and fine seafood vibrate beyond their requisite flavor profiles when jolted with charm. Al Biernat's is riddled with all of the staples: the jumbo shrimp cocktails and the jumbo lump crab cakes; the fried calamari crusted in potato; the iceberg wedge with the blue cheese gravel, the creamed spinach and creamed corn, and potatoes in six guises. Surprises bud from the uniformity. Al features elegant caviar service, blackened sea scallops with Polynesian rice, and Colorado elk to pair with his thick roster of prime Allen Brothers steaks (one of them, a Kobe-Black Angus hybrid filet). Plus, Biernat's diverse but tightly constructed wine list means that every bite will finish in vintaged savor. It's the epitome of meats and greets.
    36 articles
  • Alamo Drafthouse Cedars

    1326 S. Lamar St, Dallas / Fort Worth Oak Cliff/South Dallas

    13 articles
  • Alfonso's Italian Restaurant

    718 N. Buckner Blvd., #222 White Rock Lake Area

    214-327-7777

    Just up the street from Casa Linda, Alfonso's – named after proprietor Peter Columbo's father – has been pulling in the neighborhood crowd since 1991. The shiny black-and-white checkerboard floor, fresh flowers on the tables and colorful photos of Italian street scenes set the mood for a cozy, enjoyable dining experience. For starters, they've got an ample platter of antipasti –peppers, pepperoni, cheese, tomatoes and garlicky olives – before moving on to hot garlic rolls and rich minestrone. The chicken Marsala entrée is sautéed in white wine and served under a heap of buttery mushrooms. Most entrées come with a generous side of pasta (your choice) and spicy-sweet tomato sauce. Wind up with the icy cappuccino pie – one slice divides nicely for two.
    1 article
  • AllGood Cafe

    2934 Main St. Downtown/Deep Ellum

    214-742-5362

    If you designed the diner of your dreams, and you happened to be from south-central Texas rather than, say, New York or the Midwest, the result would look a lot like AllGood Cafe. The food here adds gentle Texan touches to American classics, like the fat slices of roasted poblano pepper in the terrific grilled cheese sandwich, or the fact that all sandwiches come with a side of tortilla chips rather than fries. The chicken-fried steak, with enormous, crisp batter that sprawls across a whole takeout container, is advertised as the “world’s best.” We don’t know if that’s true, but to find better, you’d probably have to drive to some tiny town in the Hill Country.

    Top pick: Either the fabulous chicken club sandwich, with crisp, peppery bacon and avocado, or literally any dish that comes with the restaurant’s smooth mashed potatoes and ultra-peppery gravy. Come to think of it, all our favorite dishes at AllGood have huge quantities of black pepper.

    The downside: Some of the more overt attempts at Tex-Mex cooking are inconsistent; the salsas are plain, and only a native Texan will love the mystery-cheese queso.

    Fun fact: The restaurant’s atmosphere, eclecticism and charm are best described by the slogan emblazoned across its website: “It’s like going to Austin, without having to go through Waco.”
    34 articles
  • Ame

    418 N Bishop Ave. West Dallas

    214-782-9696

    Ame in the Bishop Arts District offers an upscale setting for Indian dishes backed classic French cooking. Think masala baked eggplant with a turmeric béchamel sauce. Lamb chops are cloaked in pistachios and herbs of a perfect mound of pistachio potatoes. Samosas have a surprising pop of heat. The wine menu is extensive and the cocktail menu interesting; try the Massala sour made with Old Forester bourbon. This is a white tablecloth and linen napkins spot in the heart of the Bishop Arts District. The space is bookended by bars; one at the entrance to Ame and another speakeasy style at the back of the restaurant designed to be European-like escape.
    1 article
  • Americano

    1530 Main St. Downtown/Deep Ellum

    214-261-4600

    In a city that could use a few more casual Italian restaurants, Americano lands in the heart of downtown with a generous plate of spaghetti and meatballs. There are no red check table cloths, but the menu is decidedly Italian-American, with the simple pastas and braised and grilled meats you’d expect from the genre. If you’re looking for a simple meal, order thin-crusted pizza and a glass of house vino, and wrap it up with one of the best affogatos around. The restaurant uses the same equipment and coffee beans as Weekend Coffee, which is in the same hotel, and the espresso sports high notes of berries and cocoa, which complement the well-made gelato.
    14 articles
  • Amplified Live

    10261 Technology Boulevard E. Northwest Dallas

    214-350-1904

    Equipped with a full-service restaurant, bar and a music venue, Amplified Live has a big patio area, a private pond and live music. They offer craft and imported beers and your favorite domestics. Amplified, formerly called Gas Monkey, also has a laundry list of appetizers on their menu: fried mac n’ cheese, pulled pork stuffed peppers, wings and Texas style loaded fries with queso, bacon bits and ranch dressing.
    3 events 30 articles
  • Angry Dog

    2726 Commerce St. Downtown/Deep Ellum

    214-741-4406

    We're reluctant to use the phrase "fancy dive," but Angry Dog is dark with long tables, mismatched chairs and a wooden bar that runs almost the length of the restaurant. The name comes from its specialty – an all-beef hot dog with a choice of toppings. But the burger (which you can build yourself with a menu of extras) and the chicken-fried chicken sandwich are good, too. You'll find out after only a few bites why we've heaped so many awards on them over the years. You can wash down each bite with one of their 80-plus beers or with anything from their full bar. The Angry Dog also serves its own iced tea, which is a combination of raspberry and regular teas blended locally.
    29 articles
  • Anise

    5630 Village Glen Dr. North Dallas

    469-659-6376

    This Mediterranean restaurant located in the once-again place-to-be, The Village, is helmed by chef Aaron Skoultchi who previously had ties at Boulevardier and Rapscallion and is now making his mark with the menu at Anise. You'll find Anise inside The Drey Hotel. It's decorated with bright tiles; a long slick wooden bar beckons you. Let the spices and savory dishes transport your to an exotic location. Be sure to check out their Sunday brunch as well. Top pick: The Hawaij-Spiced shortrib is cooked medium-rare and served with two decent-sized pieces of short ribs. The meat has a dark exterior crust of Hawajj — a variety of Yemeni ground spices, typically, cumin, black pepper, turmeric, and cardamom — and a deep pink middle. It’s served on a bed of saffron rice and thick labneh and pistachios. Bright orange kumquats provide bursts of citrus. 
    2 articles
  • Antonio's Ristorante

    4985 Addison Circle, Addison North Dallas

    972-458-1010

    Luciano Cola's Italian restaurant combines rustic and elegant elements to create a casual atmosphere where friends and family can commiserate, businessmen can close deals and couples can cavort over a plate of antipasto misto della casa. Sure, there are plates of spaghetti drowned in red sauce. There is also lasagna Ripiena alla Romana (lasagna stuffed with meatballs, sausage and three cheeses), homemade gnocchi (Antonio's is a family outfit) and paglia e fieno (straw and hay). The latter is green and white fettuccine with ham, mushrooms, cream and Parmesan. The Cioppino Antonio, the house version of fisherman's stew, is huge in portion and popularity. Also popular are the pizzas, like the traditional and complex capricciosa. Ask about the daily risotto special.
    1 article
  • Anvil Pub

    2638 Elm St. Downtown/Deep Ellum

    214-741-1271

    For many years, popular dining and drinking areas of Dallas from Uptown to Greenville Avenue have had their share of English-style public houses. But, alas, Deep Ellum has never been able to draw a pub within its midst. That is until Anvil Pub opened in mid-November 2010. Which may explain why – even on the first weekend of its opening – the place already had folks from the Deep Ellum neighborhood proclaiming themselves as "regulars." That first weekend, Anvil Pub still smelled of Home Depot, which coincidentally is where the family who own and operate the pub bought the supplies needed to build Anvil. "Everything but the barstools, the chairs and the metal table bases," came from there, owner Josh Bridges said, while pouring a beer behind the long, dark wood bar. The grease-free "green" kitchen cranks out pub grub ranging from pizzas and wings to "all-natural" burgers from the menu, which boasts lots of vegetarian options.
    14 articles
  • Apothecary

    1922 Greenville Ave. East Dallas & Lakewood

    Apothecary is a dimly lit speakeasy on Lower Greenville crafting cocktails and small plates that pushes the boundaries between food and drink. The libation called an Octopus's Garden is made with tequila, nitro muddled mint, sage and basil, lime, oleo, soda, squid ink, scotch and a charred octopus tentacle ($24). The oyster Rockefeller shot is hollandaise washed breadcrumb vodka, oyster, parsley oil and lemon ($9). Impress a date with their $500 caviar service. The chef-driven kitchen offers small plates like a gimlet ceviche and flamenquine, an Iberico ham and pork tenderloin dish.
    3 articles
  • Arcodoro & Pomodoro

    100 Crescent Court, Ste. 140 Uptown/Oak Lawn

    214-871-1924

    Arcodoro & Pomodoro is no longer the casual, family-friendly Italian joint it was when the restaurant was in residence on Routh Street, and that's a boon for serious devotees of Sardinian cooking. Now in nearby Crescent Court, the restaurant excels at hard-to-find dishes such as suckling pig, panadeddas and delicate "music bread." While the pastel décor is underwhelming, diners are advised to keep their eyes on their plates-especially when enjoying the irresistible grilled sea bass, plunked between crispy crab cakes and served over scallop spinach pasta.
    14 articles
  • Ari Korean BBQ

    2625 Old Denton Rd. #800 Carrollton/Farmers Branch

    469-892-2166

    At Arirang, it’s all about noodles and dumplings. This Korean restaurant in Carrollton is tops for homemade dough, whether you order made-from-scratch noodles or plump, freshly crimped dumplings loaded with chopped kimchi. Be careful around the noodles with spicy eggplant sauce, because the word “spicy” is taken very seriously. Similarly, the noodles in savory sesame broth are such a strong sesame flavor bomb that they’re for tried-and-true members of the sesame fan club.

    Top pick: If you can’t decide, grab a bowl of soup No. 4, a noodle soup with dumplings in it, too; if the dumplings tear and meat slips into the broth, the soup only gets better.
    3 articles
  • Armoury D.E.

    2714 Elm St. Downtown/Deep Ellum

    972-803-5151

    When the Armoury D.E. opened its doors in 2015, its mission was to offer some of the best cocktails, food and live music Deep Ellum had seen in years. The Armoury has stuck to what it knows best, offering a casual dining experience with a diverse selection of Hungarian comfort foods and other good stuff that doesn’t quite fit anywhere else. Be sure to ask about the burger of the week while you’re there. Also, venture out back to catch one of their free live shows, curated with a music taste as refined as the bar’s choice in booze.
    29 articles
  • Artin's Grill

    5840 Legacy Circle, Suite D100 Plano

    469-366-3660

    Artin's suburban location may account for the menu's inclusion of such yawn-inducing standards as spinach-artichoke dip and crisped calamari, but there's no rational explanation for the ethereal flavors of chef Christopher Short's breathtaking short ribs, braised for five hours and served in a superb cabernet pan sauce. Short's also done wonders with a grilled Scottish salmon, tucked alongside a side of herbed brown rice, and an ahi tuna burger studded with sesame seeds. In good news for the restaurant's many fans – and the still uninitiated – Artin's owners are reportedly itching to build additional locations. http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/cityofate/2010/03/first_look_artins_grill.php
    5 articles
  • ArtPark

    331 Singleton Blvd #100 West Dallas

    469-722-564242

    ArtPark at Trinity Groves is a large beer garden anchored by one main restaurant, EATS, that serves a variety of American fare like ArtPark Bombs: fried, bacon-wrapped chicken bites with jalapeños for an extra flavor burst. There are almost-state-fair-like Spaghetti-O Fritters and flat-top-grilled cheeseburger too. The space is flanked by all the restaurants at Trinity Groves and serves as additional seating for those spaces. TVs and firepits throughout the space, as well as games like cornhole, make this a great gathering spot. As an ode to the neighborhood, the art work on the surrounding walls feature West Dallas street artist.
    3 articles
  • Asador

    2222 N. Stemmons Freeway Downtown/Deep Ellum

    214-267-4815

    Being a casual bistro inside of a four-star hotel has its benefits like validated parking with an optional valet and high class ambience. The updated lobby's marble finishing offers a cool, sleek look and candlelight offers warm ambience that is striking and sophisticated. Aside from the absence of the famous chandelier, Asador stays true to the nearly three decades old hotel. In keeping with the casual theme, Asador's open dining room makes the restaurant an extension of the hotel lobby. The high ceilings and contemporary furnishings lend the dining room elegance, but the exposure to the lobby reminds diners they're eating in a hotel. Entree prices run in the $20 to $38 range, yet waiters are in jeans. Customers in the dining room can watch ESPN beaming from plasma TVs in the bar area. Tourist-heavy groups of diners adorned in jean shorts and baseball caps make up most of the clientele. The self-described American cuisine menu veers toward Latin and Southwestern influences while staying true to its organic intentions. Ingredients for every dish are beautiful and fresh.
    9 articles
  • Asian Mint

    11617 N. Central Expwy, Suite 135 North Dallas

    214-363-6655

    There are few surprises at Nikky Phinyawatana's Asian fusion restaurant. The Mint menu, much like its North Dallas counterpart, lists the regular players at first glance-satay, rolls, piquant Thai soups, stir fries, Mongolian beef. Then comes the house's special pad Thai, which is available in the form of crunchy wonton strips, crab haul, low-carb (sans noodles), among others. There is a daily martini special. If you like the spice, request it. Otherwise, the kitchen will play it safe with the Highland Park locals.
    14 articles
  • Avanti Ristorante

    2720 McKinney Ave. Uptown/Oak Lawn

    214-871-4955

    Owner Jack Ekhtiar's small restaurant is a place where hip meets classic. Dark wood frames live jazz. Rustic Mediterranean fare, predominately Northern and Southern Italian, is presented elegantly. Among the examples are farfalle carbonara, a 6-ounce Brazilian lobster tail over spinach linguini alfredo and shrimp as well as carpaccio Avanti with white truffle oil. On weekends, revelers can enjoy the Moonlight Breakfast from midnight-3 am. During that seating, guests can request the signature Avanti Omelet (Italian sausage, mushrooms, green peppers and feta cheese) alongside escargot Chablisien, which is sautéed in garlic, vine-ripened tomatoes and mushrooms, then tossed with angel hair pasta, for the fancy-pants partier.
    7 articles
  • Avila's Mexican Restaurant

    4714 Maple Ave. Uptown/Oak Lawn

    214-520-2700

    The Avila family continues to serve classic Tex-Mex dishes to legions of rabid fans. They've been doing so since 1985 with tweaked family recipes of enchiladas, muchas enchiladas and chile relleno, which is a house specialty. Among the other signature dishes are the Anna Maria Plate (one soft cheese taco, one cheese enchilada and one beef taco), the chimichanga and a short list of combos, like the aforementioned Anna Maria.
    18 articles
  • Aw Shucks

    3601 Greenville Ave. East Dallas & Lakewood

    214-821-9449

    For more than 20 years, this neighborhood spot has been shelling out cheap mollusks with even cheaper brewskis. Much of the food comes in fried renditions, including oysters. However, there are many preparations offered, some unusual for shuck shack – stringed lights, coolers and picnic tables included – such as a ceviche and a trio of fish tacos made with tilapia. Less eyebrow-cocking options include crab legs, po-boys, crawfish and cole slaw that's best inhaled on the patio. Whether you're drunk on the cocktail sauce or the carbonated sauce, make sure to keep count of the beer. Payment is on the honor system. And at the Aw Shucks prices, it would be shameful to breach that code. Also, with its location across from the Granada Theater, it makes an excellent choice for pre-show drinks.
    6 articles
  • Baboush

    3636 McKinney Ave. East Dallas & Lakewood

    214-599-0707

    Persistent chatter and clanking silverware signals that you've found one of Uptown’s more promising dining spots in Baboush. Hummus and babaganoush are safe plays, served with plenty of warm pita for dipping, but the entire menu warrants attention. Shrimp and chicken kebabs and other street plates deliver bites that push conventional Moroccan cooking while staying true to tradition. No matter what you order, make use of whatever condiment is served at its side. Baboush has a condiment king working in the kitchen, and his hard work makes every plate sing.
    5 articles